Brexit – should we stay or should we go?

Here we are. Its one day before the historic referendum to determine the future of the United Kingdom, there a huge number of undecided voters remain . As the clash once asked , should I stay or should I go , many voters are asking the same.
Between 9 % and 13 % of Britons have not yet decided whether to vote to stay in the European Union or leave t . And with both campaigns desperate to get their messages across, in recent days , especially after the the brutal murder of Jo Cox,the UK MP,the polls are still undecided.
As it stands, the polls are neck and neck but the problem is that not only 54 % of Britons believe they are at the most important decision of his/her generation but 32 % of UK citizens plan to decide their vote on the week of Brexit and the other half of them will choose on the actual day so its anyone’s guess at this stage .

In the coastal town of Margate town of about 90,000 inhabitants of East Sussex county , which for years has served as a thermometer for the general election , is divided between supporters of Brexit and those who want to remain . According to data from YouGov- which is generally the poll to adhere , this town represents all that there is of the sides of being British and why to remain or to leave.
For the leave camp , it is those of their arguments against letting uncontrolled immigrants in and the Remain camp it is the worry of the economic effects of leaving the EU.
David Cameron , who has stepped up its messages about the economic risks of Brexit coupled with the important accessions are taking the campaign to stay , have made the option of staying recover votes.

The exaggerated anti immigration supporters of Brexit exploiting the false argument that immigrants abuse British subsidies when in fact only 7% of them only receive heavy support however for voters to determine their future and that of their children the eventual departure of UK from EU will lead to significant changes in the economy and possibly freedom of movement however for the remain the country also faces an era of instability , a government basically divided between those who have campaigned for the Brexit and the Bremain.

Social media has been a buzz with differing thoughts and posts.

Rowley Brown , an accountant from London posted last week

I’ve given Brexit a good hot shake. I’ve even put myself in a position of voting for it. The fact that I can’t find any reasonable case for doing it is annoying. If there was a real intellectual heavyweight supporting it or if I thought for a second the UK would be better off even further outside the EU I’d vote for it. I can’t find any of these things. IN he shouted.While Anthony Willison , a trained lawyer , tennis coach and retail shop consultant retorted “.You cannot deny that mass immigration lowers the wages of many, particularly the lower paid, that is simple demand and supply – its GCSE Economics he claimed. I have lived in Australia with their points system, and their space. The standard of living for the common man is much higher than here. Big business and the establishment reaps huge profits from our underpaid work force- hence their desperate promotion of remain. Our country is full: re roads, schools, jobs, NHS, houses and prices etc. We ARE a highly attractive small island, and we have to control immigration. Many communities are becoming deeply divided because of influx of immigration, and this will only worsen unless proper brakes are applied. We wont get another chance to do this, and a temporary economic downturn is small price to pay in the long run. Sorry LEAVE pls.
In repsonse to this Rowley replied…
“We don’t need to leave leave to control immigration. And over 50% come from outside the EU anyway. Also having lived in Australia it well known their economy is crippled by chronic inflation. Goods and services are massively expensive and its losing all of its industry (Ford and Vauxhall both closing their plants, qantas bankrupt) due entirely to horrendously inflated wages. Controlled immigration is essential for economic survival”.
Jon Beaumont is not convinced though “I’d say BIG business like remain because they are more likely to trade with Europe. I agree that immigration is the sticking point, but migrants actually bring more wealth in than they take out of the system. Their effect on wages isn’t proven either: . Plus, there will be new rules on length of time people have to claim benefits that should act as a barrier to the opportunistic types. Are immigrant communities a problem in Maidenhead? (That’s a genuine question out of interest by the way. I think local/personal experience has a lot to do with the way people will vote.)

As Facebook , Twitter ,Email , coffee shops to trains is awash with the chatter of remain to stay or to go , the referendum has made the political chat bruising , often bitter but a national conversation that will change the political spectrum for good.